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useful information, any >> i am the chair of the club of science and technology member- led forum. i'm your chair for today. we also welcome our listening and viewing audience, and we invite everyone to visit us online. now, it is my pleasure to introduce our distinguished moderator who helped us all together today's panel. he is a technology veteran with operating in investing experience in technology businesses and the ceo of a premier north american publication with data center facilities, virtual private clouds, managed hosted platforms in san francisco, los angeles, and a nationwide high- performance backbone. it is also the managing partner of excellent capital, a private equity firm investing in growth stage companies. previously, was the co-founder of centera, the leading provider of wireless base stations. prior to that, he worked at national semiconductor, where he led the development and commercialization of internet networking products. he has been -- he has a degree in management from stanford, an ms from the university of central florida, and a degree in electrical engi
francisco has been a leader in our technology community and our technology economy across our country and now we get to continue to play a role in being a leader bringing technology solutions to improve the lives of our residents here in our city. it's been a privilege to work on this project and to lead this effort the last two years and look forward to bringing the broader vision of free wi-fi across san francisco in the next few years with all the partners behind me today. this has been a strong collaboration on behalf of a lot of partners. in particular, google, sf city, our recreation and park department as well as our department of technology, and i want to thank all of those involved. this project started a little over two years ago with a conversation i had with an old family friend from google. and i want to take a moment to thank the entire google team that worked on this project. it's been two years, so, it's touched a lot of desks and had a lot of approvals and in particular want to thank veronika bell who is here from google for stepping p. up. google is providing a finan
, right -- it is really can we use all this cloud technology to takeoff structures down and across this down so now, i can change and 8% spent on a bunch of stuff that other people can go due to 80% i get to build applications, which power a very different experience. you think about what the car of the future might look like, it is a computer with four wheels, right? that is what it is. what they start to do with it, etc., is completely different. i'm talking about what we all conceptualize as a manufacturer. when you ask the question what will happen in the future? it is harnessing this technology to really deliver a service economy, and the companies that do this, the guys that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program w
technology partners, our communications partners, our department leaders, new ones as well as old ones, are saying this is just the beginning. this is literally the beginning of a continued effort to innovate, innovate, and innovate. and i like what mark said. not only are there no strings attached. really the benefits are targeted at our residents and our visitors, but that the only thing we're going to see is wireless connected to our fiber. we're learning that. we're learning that our fine and some of the backbones that we've always had to depend on can be improved on. i have to admit, the new director will also tell you we are behind. i call our self-the innovation capital of the world, but we're behind in many ways and we need to catch up. we need to do more, but sometimes the funding wasn't there and it costs more than we think and we're trying to figure things out and trying to get as modern as fast as we can. and this is where i think that relationship with the private sector, particularly with our technology and innovative companies in san francisco is so important to us, that
? >> sure. st. francis demonstrates well the evolution of elevated technology. and substantially damaged the 1906 earthquake and rebuilt in 1907 or 1908, and extend it again in 1913. then a new tower was added in 1932, so there is all sorts of elevator technology you can see at the st. francis that very much represents the building history of san francisco. >> i understand there is a really old elevator still operating here. >> that is right, the elevator installed in the 1913 expansion. we can go look at that. >> let's go take a look. here we are in a spectacular st. francis lobby. here is the clock. when people say "meet me at the clock in the st. francis." let's look at that elevator. >> ok, let's do it. >> here we are in the elevator installed as part of the expansion, and this is the way it was originally installed about 100 years ago. it has a manual switch just like elevators did back then, and it runs on dc power. this was from a time before elevators ran on ac power. >> when did they switch? >> decided to switch in the 1920's, so this elevator predicts that by about 19 years. th
cloud is often called technology. i've heard him call it a business model. he has written a very popular vote which compares all the different business models. tell us why you feel that way. >> actually, i'm going to make a comment before that. a lot of people discuss whether or not corporations are going to use the cloud. i actually did a thing -- i had to do a talk about a year-and-a- half ago to 40 of the largest company cio's on the planet. i said the list because i knew who was going to be in the room, to all of my buddies, and ask who of those were customers. so i abrogated all of the data. anybody want to guess? out of 40 of the largest companies in the world, how many of the were using one or more of these -- there was about seven different applications, all delivered out of clout, -- cloud. that's over. best guess, not over. 38 out of 40. of the largest companies in the world. using one or more of these. when we debate the question of will corporations use the cloud, i would say they already have. we clearly are still in the early adoption days. i rattle off some very interestin
and that will be live google plus streamed. all sorts of fun technology. but before the publication of her book, and the subsequent film, this was probably one of the most famous compositions by verm ere, certainly the most famous, and has three paintings and i love that the way that the clouds hang so low and it is actually much darker on my screen, but this kind of balance between the rain clouds and the white pufffy clouds and the way that they interacts with the buildings in the city. this competes with two other paintings in the exhibition and i will not say which ones they are and it competes for my favorite painting in the exhibition it is view of harlem with bleaching grounds in the foregrounds and one of the most important innovations for the 17th century, dutch landscape painters was the way that they approached the sky. for any of you who have traveled to the netherlands you know that there is a low horizon line and i have been told that the dutch people and i can be corrected. that they call their clouds the dutch mountains because the landscape is so low that really you get these m
wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these
a technology geek's really dream, is to have all of this data available so that we can mine them in different ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they have for the last ten years building up a ecosystem of pharmaceutical companies and san francisco medical center and integrated around with the research teams to form a very strong research center and because of
connected through technology. in my lifetime technology has bridged the gap between not employed. i meet a resident who has connected to people all over the world and wanted others to have this experience so he started a computer club. i've seen the confidence go up. the club is set up so residents become trainers. everyone passed the skills forward. air royal they're part of the community and findings value in their talent. i urge you to employ seniors and people with disabilities in computer labs around san francisco. you have a golden opportunity to be a leader to show the rest of the in addition, the capped resources of people and seniors with disabilities. when you were looking at the budget keep in mind how technology has connected the community. there were none before. thank you for the opportunity to be heard >> thank you very much. >> thank you. next speaker, please >> why don't we keep doing. >> i'm jessica. >> hold on one second let's get the microphone on. we need the microphone victor >> now i can here myself. i'm confused of the programs. the seniors have ensured lot
through the city and county san francisco - >> good morning supervisors i'm alice i'm the technology coordinator. could i i want to ask you to continue your district funding. currently we're able to offer this service, however, this grant which has helped us serve over 4 hundred youth and adults will sunset on june 30th. without this funding for the youth and communities our lab will be unable to sustain it's program. today, the youth with me are just a few of those who use the technology daily. i've seen them development 20th century skills. please continue to connect our county with those resources. please help us to get the computer assess and thoughtful use service we need to have the right to have. thanks >> good afternoon board of supervisors. i'm matthew i work at the beau con center. due to those channeling economic times we've been hit with unemployment. it is home to the most diverse community. according to the status we're the lowest work group. as the district that has 9 percent of household living below the poverty level yet we receive zero dollars until we came last ye
sf thank you and today sports 6 hundred members of our technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking somebody in the eye and saying i care about where you're going and i don't want you to necessarily live the rough-and-tumble street life. get some she felt and food and take a moment and think about what's happening next week. we care about your background. we know there may not be other supporters in your life. we care about you a because we know about life and want to share >> compassion in san francisco. this is what project homeless is all about and hopefully with that opportunity something might occur
as they continue on the road to technology and on comprehensive immigration reform. to work within the time we have i'm going to dispense with long introductions but let me mention the enterprises. this people has gnltd from europe and she co- founded her company. born in columbia we have alexander he is the do founder of voice bunny and he's a recent father and returned almost right after his little girl was born to the white house to be honored and we'll be hearing about that. and the third narrator is the chief at bright sons. we received his masters in commuter science and other degrees from ucla. join me in welcoming our panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reu
anymore. we use a moment magnitude. the richter scale was early technology. >> probably a myth that i hear most often is my building is just fine in the loma prieta earthquake so everything is fine. is that true ? >> loma prieta was different. the ground acceleration here was quite moderate and the duration was moderate. so anyone that believes they survived a big earthquake and their building has been tested is sadly mistaken. >> we are planning for the bigger earthquake closer to san francisco and a fault totally independent. >> much stronger than the loma prieta earthquake. >> so people who were here in '89 they should say 3 times as strong and twice as long and that will give them more of an occasion of the earthquake we would have. 10 percent isn't really the threshold of damage. when you triple it you cross that line. it's much more damage in earthquake. >> i want to thank you, harvey, thanks pat for >> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100 facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have
technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. n be one with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalitie
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
schools and be ready in the science and technology or other fields of that era? will they be able to interact, appreciate and love and more diverse setting than we've ever seen before? our job today is for the answer and 2029 to be not just, yes we can, but yes, we did. it is now my honor to introduce the mayor of our great city and county of san francisco, and lee. i've known him and admired him since his days as a civil rights attorney at the asian law caucus. mayor lee has worked hard to keep the economy and economic recovery on track. to create jobs for our residents. mayor lee keeps his focus on making san francisco a city that celebrates diversity and leads the way in job creation innovation, education, healthcare, and the environment for future generations. mayor lee began his career in civil rights as a community activist. he later served as director of our san francisco human rights commission fighting for people who weren't able to have their voices heard. now as mayor, he continues the fight closing people i implement programs and services that help our most vulnerable
think, for example, our police department a we're working on with technology, another good example. one of these days we're going to have officers be able to dot reports while they're in their vehicles in the streets rather than coming back to their stations and spending 2 or 3 hours trying to do all the reports ~. we're working on that right now. but, you know, i think any city who needs the resources at their highest performance will look towards technology to help us reduce what we're doing today that could be done faster, quicker, and more efficiently and just as thoroughly. >> mayor, i think you answered this already, but i didn't quite hear her question. google is going to provide the financial [speaker not understood], correct? >> yes. >> after that what happens? >> well, first of all, i think we will make whatever proper investments we will have because we will consider this to be part of the infrastructure of our parks and recreation. as we do wi-fi in neighborhood corridors, we have infrastructure there. so, when i say that we are responsible, the city is responsible for infra
i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but o
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
of our energy. it's going to take time. it's going to take technology. it's going to take scientific breakthroughs, research, and development. and it's going to take storage. and it's going to take various insebastianvv stifle. just in california you have some cities that charge 1800 bucks for a permit for somebody to put solar on their roof. we have to fight that. there are soft costs. we can bring that down. from the small incremental step to the long march in getting it done, those are all the elements that you have to deal with. and there are some pauses, sometimes things plateau. i know some utilities feel we have enough for 33 and a third percent which is our state goal. we have to find other states. we've got to get other people putting out that 33% renewable standard. we've got to get -- and we do, we have a law in california encouraging storage because we can't just rely on the sunlight. (applause) >> we've got to bottle the sunlight. you've probably heard about that. we're bottling sunlight. well, that' a metaphor for storage. but we can get it done. you know, in a time of
's a new technology used to connected with clients. so as we continue to be innovative we're participating with other. go ahead rose >> thanks. so you won't be surprised to here like all of you i'm here to help our community. but i'm here to a launch my start up so here's the launch. yeah. (clapping) >> hand up is a new hand up program it lets you sdmoot directly to folks using a text message and it can only be used for food and clothing through project connect (clapping) so we're going to be signing up about 70 people today and you can invite their profiles it's hand up dot us our website. i'd like to thank mr. dusty and the mayor's office of innovation and the mayor thank you. i want to thank our start up inincubator and, of course, project homeless connection our partners and people who are putting together this incredible event so give an applause for them too. thanks guys check us out on line. who wants the shirts >> thank you all go ahead and stay seated for the volunteer training. i'll be here so stop by and say hi, and invest us on facebook ♪ ♪ >> hello, i am with the recrea
. the technology network in san jose who made this a crucial project. i want to call out a thanks to or tactical team. we know how to make it small, not over 150 feet in the air. we have a studio, zone engineering and i have to say thanks to hmr who has been a rock star and directly one of the reasons this is happening. an extremely talented project. thank you all. i also want to just take a moment to really acknowledge that while leo and i have done a lot of things m in this world, we would not be able to do it alone. there is only one person responsible for this project and that is executive director of the arts. luminarias. i can go on and on. i think i will throughout the night. do know that she's a special person and this entire community owes her a debt of gratitude. i want to thank leo and his family for bringing the level of artistic integrity for this work that somehow slipped through the progress of a work of contemporary art parallel in art history. it has everything to do with leo and our interpretations with our discussion and that one minute that transformed how people will be rec
with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco
or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before they escalate to a more violent crime or serious crime. it's nice to
to caution that implementing transit signal priority technology can be both a good and bad thing. in chinatown over the last 36 years we found that we always try to reach a balance with the different uses. and if buses always get priority it would create gridlock again. thank you >> thank you. >> good afternoon i was given the privilege of speaking out of order so i'm not the person whose name appears after chin. i'm michael and i live on libl street. i'm an immigrant from the northeast coast. i had the privilege of living in the areas of europe market and the area between russian and knob hill i guess it's the extended chinatown and on the windy hilly part of the valley and had experience working with the same organization with muni and was involved with the planning staff. one quick comment it seems like we're getting questions today an individual proposals as well as some of the general proposals that maybe are couched in terms of the eir itself. in terms of the bus bulks i want to argue them with the previous speakers but i presume the eir authors take into account and look
girls. we have dating violence much heroin higher than for boys. girls are under enrolled in technology classes. i'm shocked they're not in the fund. they horrify most organizations got doubled their grant size and seven hundred thldz was lost. while $8 million was spent on others programs. your sending the city a message that girls are not a priority and that's not on okay messages to send. we met with the director and she were incredibly receptive. she alleged that we can work together in the next grant cycle and i'm grateful for that but girls can't wait that long >> thank you. next speaker, please >> hi i'm jessica. as i heard from the imperials alliance the needs for girls programs is dire. oasis has been partnered with other organizations. however, we received a 24 percent kit which is about 50 $50,000 out of our crack. we're been working with maria sue and we're grateful. however, our partners have not been that fortunate. thank you >> hi i'm 15-year-old and i joined oasis and it changed my life. ail the love from this program made me the person i am. i've learned so many thi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)